oxeye daisy USDA PLANTS Symbol: LEVU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Leucanthemum vulgare Lam.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Asterales: Asteraceae
Synonym(s): ox-eye daisy
Native Range: Europe and Asia (BAIL);

Oxeye daisy is a perennial that can reach from 1-3 ft. (0.3-1 m) in height. A single plant can produce from 1-40 flowering stems. Leaves are 1-4 in. (2.5-10 cm) long, toothed (or lobed) and decrease in size closer to the apex of the stem. Basal leaves are spoon-shaped and petiolate. Flowering occurs all summer, when daisy-like flower heads develop. Each flower head can produce up to 200 flat seeds that are 0.08 in. (2 mm) long. Oxeye daisy is native to Europe and was introduced into the United States as an ornamental in the 1800s. The plants have been shown to carry several crop diseases. Oxeye daisy can thrive in a wide variety of soil types and can grow in sun to partial shade.

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); in flower
Mary Ellen (Mel) Harte, , Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Wendy VanDyk Evans, , Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); involucral bracts
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Ohio State Weed Lab Archive, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Ohio State Weed Lab Archive, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Wendy VanDyk Evans, , Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); Daisylike flower, Leucanthemum vulgare
Keith Weller, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Pedro Tenorio-Lezama, , Bugwood.org
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Root(s); Roots
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Ken Chamberlain, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Antietam National Battlefield (Maryland)
Glacier National Park (Montana)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
Rocky Mountains National Park (Colorado)
Stones River National Battlefield (Tennessee)
Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)
Yosemite National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Faith Campbell, 1998
Forest Service-Alaska, 2004
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Missouri Department of Conservation,
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council