foxglove USDA PLANTS Symbol: DIPU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Digitalis purpurea L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Scrophulariales: Scrophulariaceae
Synonym(s): purple foxglove
Native Range: Portugal, Spain (BAIL);

Appearance
Digitalis purpurea is an herbaceous biennial or short lived perennial plant.
Foliage
The leaves are spirally arranged, simple, 3.9-13.8 in. (10-35 cm) long and 2-4.7 in. (5-12 cm) broad, and are covered with gray-white pubescent and glandular hairs. The foliage forms a tight rosette at ground level in the first year.
Flowers
The flowering stem develops in the second year, from about 3.3-6.6 ft. (1-2 m) tall. The flowers are arranged in a showy, terminal, elongated cluster, and each flower is tubular and pendent. The flowers are typically purple but some plants, under cultivation, may be pink, rose, yellow, or white. The corolla is spotted inside the bottom of the tube. Flowers in early summer.
Fruit
The fruit is a capsule which splits open at maturity to release the numerous tiny 0.004-0.007 in. (0.1-0.2 mm) seeds.
Ecological Threat
Due to the cardiac glycoside digitoxin, in the leaves, flowers and seeds of this plant, it is poisonous to humans and some animals and can be fatal if eaten.

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); Multi stemmed flowering plant next to a windrow of brash. Gwydyr Forest, N. Wales, UK. The site had been clear felled and replanted a couple of years previously. This plant probably came from the soil seed bank and was enjoying the brief opportunity before being overtaken by the next rotation of conifers.
Francis Gwyn Jones, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Joy Viola, Northeastern University, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Barbara Tokarska-Guzik, University of Silesia, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); flowering stem.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); Flowers from June to August. Protected. Poland.
Gil Wojciech, Polish Forest Research Institute, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); flowers.
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); Oregon
Barry Rice, sarracenia.com, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Redwood National Park (California)
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (Californina)
Yosemite National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998