bermudagrass USDA PLANTS Symbol: CYDA
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): common bermudagrass, devilgrass
Native Range: Old World (BAIL);

Bermudagrass is a perennial grass that occurs on almost all soil types. This grass spreads by above ground and underground runners. Leaves are gray-green and 1.5-5.9 in. (4-15 cm) long. The ligule has a ring of white hairs. Flowering occurs in late summer; flowers occur on 1-3 in. (3-7 cm) spikes. Bermudagrass is native to eastern Africa and prefers moist and warm climates with high light. It was introduced into North America in the mid-1800s as a pasture grass. Bermudagrass is widely used as a turf grass.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Charles T. Bryson, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Spikelet(s); Sessile spikelets
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Bruce Ackley, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); Lateral view of caryopsis. Note the bifid stylar base at the apex of the fruit.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Floret(s); Florets, some with a glume still attached.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Chiricahua National Monument (Arizona)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Death Valley National Park (California)
Fort Bowie National Historic Site (Arizona)
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Utah)
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Lake Mead National Park (Nevada)
Organ Pipe National Monument (Arizona)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jackie Poole, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (personal communication)
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Hawaiian Alien Plant Studies, 1998
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009