Siberian elm USDA PLANTS Symbol: ULPU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees Shrub or Subshrub
Ulmus pumila L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Urticales: Ulmaceae
Native Range: E. Siberia, N. China, Turkestan (REHD); Temp. Asia (GRIN);

Siberian elm is a deciduous tree up to 70 ft. (21.3 m) in height. The crown is open and rounded with slender, spreading branches. The leaves are less than 3 in. (7.6 cm) long, alternate, simple, singly-serrate, and dark-green in color. The bark is light-gray with irregular furrows. Green, inconspicuous flowers develop, in drooping clusters, in the spring. Fruits are flat, circular and 1/2 in. (1.3 cm) wide. Siberian elm invades pastures, roadsides and prairies throughout the Midwest and Great Plains regions of the United States. The trees are very drought and cold resistant allowing it to grow in areas where other trees cannot. The abundant, wind-dispersed seeds allow this plant to spread rapidly. Siberian elm forms dense thickets that close open areas and displace native vegetation, thereby reducing forage for wild animals and livestock. Siberian elm is native to northern Asia and was first introduced into North America in the 1860s. It has been planted throughout the Midwest and Great Plains for windbreaks and lumber.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; In undeveloped land near house
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Patrick Breen, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
Patrick Breen, Oregon State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
USDA NRCS Archive, USDA NRCS, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Utah)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Eric Ulaszek, U.S. Forest Service, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, 1998
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009