mile-a-minute vine USDA PLANTS Symbol: POPE10
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Vines
Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Polygonales: Polygonaceae
Synonym(s): devil's tearthumb
Native Range: Temp. & trop. Asia (GRIN);

Mile-a-minute weed is an herbaceous, annual vine that invades disturbed areas in Oregon and portions of the northeastern United States. The delicate stems are reddish, highly branched and covered with small, curved spines. Circular, leafy structures (ocreae) surround the stem at the base of the petioles. The alternate leaves are triangular, light green, 1-3 in. (2.5-7.6 cm) wide and barbed on the undersurface. Small, white, inconspicuous flowers arise from the ocreae. Fruits, present in mid-July through the first frost, are metallic blue and segmented with each segment containing a single black or reddish black seed. Mile-a-minute weed invades open disturbed areas such as fields, forest edges, roadsides, ditches and stream banks. Its rapid growth allows it to cover existing vegetation and restrict light availability, potentially killing plants below. Dense mats of mile-a-minute weed can also restrict establishment of new vegetation. Mile-a-minute weed is native to Eastern Asia and the Philippines and was introduced several times into the United States from the late 1800s to the 1930s.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Foliage;
Jil Swearingen, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
USDA APHIS PPQ Archive, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Britt Slattery, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Kenneth R. Law, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Armed Stems
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);  immature
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); Close-up of Fruits and Ocreate
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Catoctin Mountain Park (Maryland)
George Washington Memorial Parkway (Virginia)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)
Minute Man National Historical Park (Massachusetts)
Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Maryland)
National Capital Parks East (Washington, D.C.)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)
Shenandoah National Park (Virginia)
Thomas Stone National Historic Site (Maryland)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Invasive Plant Council of New York State
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Tatyana Livschultz, Pennsylvania survey of invasive plants,
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009