golden bamboo USDA PLANTS Symbol: PHAU8
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike Shrub or Subshrub
Phyllostachys aurea Carr. ex A.& C. Rivière

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Native Range: China, Japan (REHD); temp. Asia (GRIN)

Golden bamboo is a perennial, reed-like plant that can reach heights of 16 to 40 ft. (5-12 m). The canes (stems) are hollow with solid joints and can be 1 to 6 in. (2.5-15.2 cm) in diameter. Leaves are alternate, 3-10 in. (7.6-25.4 cm) long and 0.25-0.75 in. (0.6-1.9 cm) wide. Flowering is very rare (maybe once every 7 to 12 years). Plants spread by rhizomes. Infestations are commonly found around old homesites and can rapidly expand in size. Golden bamboo can form dense, monocultural thickets that displace native species. Once golden bamboo is established, it is difficult to remove. Golden bamboo is native to China and was first introduced into the United States in 1882 for ornamental purposes.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); New sprout in September
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s); July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s); planted but usually soon regretted, would be one of our worst weeds, except it seldom, if ever produces seeds
James R. Allison, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Stems
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Infestation along right-of-way
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
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Stem(s);
David Stephens, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009