sacred bamboo USDA PLANTS Symbol: NADO
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Nandina domestica Thunb.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Ranunculales: Berberidaceae
Synonym(s): heavenly bamboo, nanten
Native Range: C. China to Japan (REHD),

Sacred bamboo invades forests throughout the Southeast United States. It is a small, erect shrub that grows up to 8 ft. (2.4 m) tall. Leaves are alternate, large, bi- or tri-pinnately compound with small, 1-2 in. (2.5-5.1 cm) long leaflets. Flowering occurs in the spring, when small, white flowers develop in large panicles at the ends of the stems. Flowers have 3-6 reflexed petals. Fruits are green berries that mature to a bright red. The older stems have bark with long, linear furrows. The overlapping leaf sheaths give the main stem the appearance of bamboo, hence the name. Sacred bamboo is shade tolerant, which allows it to invade forest edges and interiors. It is native to eastern Asia and India and was first introduced to North America in the early 1800s. It has been planted widely as an ornamental and often escapes from old plantings.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Feature(s); woody stem in September
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); woody stem in September
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; in December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; in December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); in June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); in June
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Fruiting plant in March
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Fruiting plant in March
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature fruits
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature fruits
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); August
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); August
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); May
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); May
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); May
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); May
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); December
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Young Plant
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Young Plant
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); fruits
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); fruits
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Petersburg National Battlefield (Virginia)
San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (Texas)
Stones River National Battlefield (Tennessee)
Vicksburg National Military Park (Mississippi)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council