parrotfeather USDA PLANTS Symbol: MYAQ2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic Forbs/Herbs
Myriophyllum aquaticum (Vell.) Verdc.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Haloragales: Haloragaceae
Synonym(s): parrotfeather watermilfoil, water-feather, Brazilian water-milfoil, parrotfeather
Native Range: Brazil, Argentina, Chile ()

Parrotfeather watermilfoil is an herbaceous, rooted, submerged/emergent plant that invades aquatic habitats throughout much of the United States. Stems are stout and blue-green in color. Leaves are abundant, whorled, pinnately compound, and finely dissected. Submersed leaves are 0.6-1.4 in. (1.5-3.5 cm) long and have 20 to 30 divisions per leaf. Emergent leaves are 0.8-2 in. (2-5 cm) long, less divided and greener than the submersed leaves. As only female plants occur in North America, reproduction occurs vegetatively. Inconspicuous flowers are formed in the axils of the emergent leaves in the spring (sometimes fall). Parrotfeather watermilfoil is found in lakes, ponds, and slow moving streams where it can form dense mats of vegetation. These mats can clog waterways, impede boating traffic, disrupt the growth of native vegetation and provide a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Parrotfeather watermilfoil is native to South America and was first introduced into the United States in the Washington DC area around 1890 as an aquarium and aquatic garden plant.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Alison Fox, University of Florida, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Graves Lovell, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Emerging leaves
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Graves Lovell, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Emerging leaves
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Graves Lovell, Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
California Invasive Plant Council
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009