chinaberry USDA PLANTS Symbol: MEAZ
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees Shrub or Subshrub
Melia azedarach L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Sapindales: Meliaceae
Synonym(s): Chinaberrytree, Persian lilac, pride-of-India, chinaberry, umbrella tree
Native Range: Himalayas (); Asia (BAIL)

Chinaberry is a deciduous tree growing to 50 ft. (15.2 m) in height and 2 ft. (0.6 m) in diameter. The leaves are alternate, bi-pinnately compound, 1 to 2 ft. (0.3-0.6 m) in length and turn golden-yellow in fall. Flowering occurs in the spring, when showy, lavender, 5-petaled flowers develop in panicles. Fruit are hard, yellow, marble-sized, stalked berries that can be dangerous on sidewalks and other walkways. Seeds are spread by birds. Chinaberry invades disturbed areas and is commonly found along roads and forest edges. It has the potential to grow in dense thickets, restricting the growth of native vegetation. Chinaberry is native to Southeast Asia and northern Australia. It was introduced into the United States in the mid 1800s for ornamental purposes.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Tree(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature
Franklin Bonner, USFS (ret.), Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Leaf study
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Flowers with mature fruit from previous season in May
James H. Miller & Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s);
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Unopened flower buds; panicle shape easy to see here; April 2011; Coastal plains
Karan A. Rawlins, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in winter
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s); November
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; along road
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
David J. Moorhead, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (Texas)
Vicksburg National Military Park (Mississippi)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Hawaiian Alien Plant Studies, 1998
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009