Japanese climbing fern USDA PLANTS Symbol: LYJA
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Vines Ferns
Lygodium japonicum (Thunb. ex Murr.) Sw.

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Taxonomic Rank: Filicopsida: Polypodiales: Lygodiaceae
Native Range: E. Asia -temp. (BAIL);

Japanese climbing fern is a perennial climbing fern that can reach lengths of 90 ft. (30 m). Vines are thin, wiry, green to orange to black and usually die back in the winter. The fronds (leaves of a fern) are opposite, compound, usually triangular in shape, 3-6 in. (8-15 cm) long, 2-3 in. (5-8 cm) wide and finely dissected. Fertile fronds bear sporangia that produce tiny, wind-dispersed spores. Plants are also spread by rhizomes. Japanese climbing fern often invades disturbed areas such as roadsides and ditches, but can also invade natural areas. It generally is scattered throughout the landscape, but can form dense mats that smother understory vegetation, shrubs and trees. Japanese climbing fern is native to eastern Asia and was first introduced into the United States during the 1930s for ornamental purposes.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Infestation; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); September
James H. Miller & Ted Bodner, Southern Weed Science Society, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; July
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Prescribed Fire;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Dispersal; Plant in a pine straw bale
Dennis Teague, U.S. Air Force, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Infesting a planted pine stand, GA
Wayne Williamson, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); Vines and Fronds.
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Tift County, GA
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Control; Backpack sprayer, glyphosate treatment. Tift County, GA
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Spore-producing fronds.
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage; Fertile fronds
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); September
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s); January
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Ronald F. Billings, Texas Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chuck Bargeron, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.


Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Archbold Biological Station
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council