common teasel USDA PLANTS Symbol: DIFU2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Dipsacus fullonum L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Dipsacales: Dipsacaceae
Synonym(s): Fuller's teasel, teasel
Native Range: Europe, Asia (BAIL);

Common teasel is a biennial plant that exists as a basal rosette until flower stems develop. The erect flower stems reach 6 ft. (1.8 m) in height and support spiny flower heads that are covered with small, lavender to white flowers in April to September. Rosette leaves are lanceolate to oblanceolate and stem leaves are opposite, lanceolate and fused at the base. All leaves have short prickles on the midvein. Common teasel favors disturbed sites such as roadsides, ditches, waste places, riparian sites, fields and pastures in most of the continental United States. Only recently was common teasel distinguished from fullers teasel which was once cultivated for the dried flower heads used in wool processing. It is native to Europe.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Rosettes
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in flower
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Old seed head
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
David Cappaert, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 3: 289.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Maryland)
Redwood National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Missouri Department of Conservation,
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009