Norway maple USDA PLANTS Symbol: ACPL
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees
Acer platanoides L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Sapindales: Aceraceae
Native Range: Europe, Caucasus (REHD); Europe, Caucasus, n. Turkey, n. Iran (BAIL);

Appearance
Acer platanoides is a tree that usually grows to 40-60 ft. (12-18 m) in height, but can reach heights of 100 ft. (30 m). The bark of the tree is grayish and regularly and shallowly grooved.
Foliage
The palmately lobed leaves are opposite and have 5 to 7 sharply acuminate lobes (with large but few teeth). These leaves are 4-7 in. (10-18 cm) wide. The leaf petioles exude a white sap when broken. The leaves are usually green in color, but there are some cultivars that have dark red leaves. The fall color of the green leaves is yellow.
Flowers
The flowers appear in April and May and are yellow-green in color. They are borne in erect, pedunculate, rounded corymbs. Each flower is 0.25 in. (5-6 mm) wide.
Fruit
The pendulous fruit measure 1.5-2 in. (4-5 cm) in length. The fruit are samaras that are green when young and turn yellow, then brown, with age. The samara wings are divergent, reaching nearly 180 degree angle to each other and are dispersed by wind.
Ecological Threat
Acer platanoides is able to shade out native understory vegetation such as spring ephemerals, and eventually out-competes native tree species in the forest canopy. Thus, it can reduce native species diversity and change the structure of forest habitats.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Tree(s); habitat; flower
Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Tree(s); habitat; flower
Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Jan Samanek, Phytosanitary Administration, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); samaras
Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Bill Cook, Michigan State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); inflorescence
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Jan Samanek, Phytosanitary Administration, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); 1. Branchlet with corymb, terminating developing young shoots (a - e) with deciduous (typically green) transitional leaves at their base (k). - 2. Branchlet with mature leaves and ripe fruits (double samaras). Stalk exuding a milky sap when broken. Wings of the samaras spread perpendicular to the pedicels (»horizontally spreading«), with conspicuously flat nutlets. - 3. Seedling with cotyledons (c) and first pair of ordinary leaves. - 4. Winter-branchlet; buds are reddish-brown, glossy, terminal bud is larger. Leaf-scars are opposite, horseshoe- or heart-shaped and connected extreme laterally. After Hempel & Wilhelm, 1889. Photos and explanations from the book: Zelimir Borzan. "Tree and Shrub Names in Latin, Croatian, English, and German, with synonyms", University of Zagreb, 2001.
Zelimir Borzan, University of Zagreb, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Keith Kanoti, Maine Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s); Buds
Paul Wray, Iowa State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Acadia National Park (Maine)
Antietam National Battlefield (Maryland)
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (Maryland, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Eisenhower National Historic Site (Pennsylvania)
Gettysburg National Military Park (Pennsylvania)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)
Monocacy National Battlefield Park (Maryland)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Delaware Natural Resources and Environmental Control, 2004
Eric Ulaszek, U.S. Forest Service, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois
Faith Campbell, 1998
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society
Invasive Plant Council of New York State
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Tatyana Livschultz, Pennsylvania survey of invasive plants,
Virginia Invasive Plant Species List