cogongrass USDA PLANTS Symbol: IMCY
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Grass or Grasslike
Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Cyperales: Poaceae
Synonym(s): cogon grass, alang-alang, Japanese blood grass
Native Range: Old World trop. & temp regions (GRIN);

Cogongrass is a perennial, colony-forming grass which can grow up to 6 ft. (1.8 m) tall. Leaves have an off-center, whitish midrib and finely serrated margins. Leaves are up to 6 ft. (1.8 m) long, 0.5-0.75 in. (1.3-1.9 cm) wide, stiff, and have a sharp, pointed apex. Rhizomes are whitish, branched, scaly and sharp at the tips. Cogongrass is best identified in the spring by the large fuzzy panicle of flowers and seeds, giving the plant a cottony or silky look. Flower heads are 2-8 in. (5.1-20.3 cm) long, silvery-white and cylindrical. Cogongrass is an extremely aggressive invader with the capability of invading a range of sites. It forms dense, usually circular infestations that exclude all other vegetation. Cogongrass is native to Southeast Asia and was accidently introduced into the southeast United States in packing material in the early 1900s. It was also intentionally introduced for erosion control and livestock forage.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Seed(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Feature(s);
L. M. Marsh, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Florida Division of Plant Industry Archive, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Rhizome / Stolon; Pointed rhizome
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); "Red Baron" variety in a greenhouse
Charles T. Bryson, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Large infestation
Wilson Faircloth, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s); seeds on tractor radiator
Wilson Faircloth, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Research; Control plots
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Prescribed Fire; Prescribed fire to reduce thatch.
Chris Evans, Illinois Wildlife Action Plan, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Control; Art Miller, USDA APHIS PPQ, spraying herbicide
USDA APHIS PPQ Archive, USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

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U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Alabama Invasive Plant Council
Archbold Biological Station
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009