yellow floating heart USDA PLANTS Symbol: NYPE
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic Plants
Nymphoides peltata (S.G. Gmel.) Kuntze

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Solanales: Menyanthaceae
Native Range: Europe, Asia ()

Appearance
Nymphoides peltata is an herbaceous, perennial, aquatic plant that has stout, branching stems up to 0.1 in. (2-3 mm) thick. It is often found rooted in the mud of still bodies of water.
Foliage
The leaves, which arise from rhizomes and are usually opposite and unequal. The leaves are cordate to subrotund in shape measuring from 2-6 in. (5-15 cm) long and wide.
Flowers
The bright yellow flowers of Nymphoides peltata have five petals, and measure from 1-1.5 in. (3-4 cm) in diameter when fully open. There is one to several flowers on each stalk. The edges of the petals are fringed. This plant flowers from June to September.
Fruit
The seeds of are contained in beaked capsules that measure 0.5-1 in. (1.2-2.5 cm) in length. The seeds themselves are flat and oval in shape, and have ciliate margins that measure 0.1 in. (3.5 mm) in length.
Ecological Threat
Although N. peltata has the potential to shade and crowd out native aquatic plants. In warmer areas it has formed large stands that can block waterways. N. peltata is still commonly sold as a plant for water gardens, and can be carelessly disposed of into local waterbodies. It prefers the still waters found in lakes and ponds. It is often found in water gardens, which are the source of many of its introductions.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Infestation;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Rob Andress, Department of Conservation & Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Theodore Webster, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
David Cappaert, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Rob Andress, Department of Conservation & Natural Resources, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Theodore Webster, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.


Invasive Listing Sources:
Faith Campbell, 1998
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation