Amur privet USDA PLANTS Symbol: LIAM
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Ligustrum amurense Carrière

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Scrophulariales: Oleaceae
Native Range: N. China (REHD, BAIL);

Appearance
Ligustrum amurense is a dense, erect, multi-stemmed, fast-growing, deciduous shrub (semi-evergreen in mild winter areas) that grows up to 12-15 ft (3.7-4.6 m) tall. It is native to Northern China.
Foliage
The simple opposite leaves are elliptic to oblong in shape and grow up to about 2.5 in (6.4 cm) long. Leaves are usually dull green above with entire margins and hair on the underside midribs.
Flowers
Flowers are creamy white and held in panicles about 2 in (5.1 cm) long. Flowers have an aroma that many people find unpleasant. Flowers bloom from May-June.
Fruit
Green oval fruit ripen to black drupes which each contain a single seed. Fruit ripens in fall.
Ecological Threat
L. amurense grows well in average, dry to medium, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. It does not do well in wet conditions. L. amurense is tolerant of a wide range of soils and is tolerant of urban conditions. Plants will naturalize by self-seeding in optimum growing conditions, and may form thickets in areas where growth is not controlled. L. amurense has been planted extensively in landscape settings as a hedge.

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); Ligustrum amurense; Privet hedge Amur
Richard Webb, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.


Invasive Listing Sources:
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.