chocolate vine USDA PLANTS Symbol: AKQU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Vines
Akebia quinata (Houtt.) Dcne.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Ranunculales: Lardizabalaceae
Synonym(s): fiveleaf akebia
Native Range: China, Japan and Korea (REHD, BAIL);

Chocolate vine, also called fiveleaf akebia, is a deciduous to evergreen climbing or trailing vine that invades forested areas throughout the eastern United States. The twining vines are green when young, turning brown with age. The leaves are palmately compound with up to five, 1 ½ to 3 in. (2.5-7.6 cm) long, oval leaflets. Flowering occurs in the mid-spring, when small, purple to red, fragrant flowers develop. Fruit are purple seed pods that contain white pulp and small black seeds. Fruits are rarely produced. Chocolate vine is shade tolerant and invades forested habitats. The dense mat of vines formed can displace native understory species. It can also climb into, smother, and kill small trees and shrubs. Chocolate vine is native to eastern Asia and was first introduced into the United States in 1845 as an ornamental.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Infestation;
Shep Zedaker, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); In May
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature fruit
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Nancy Loewenstein, Auburn University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Nancy Dagley, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s); Seed pods In May
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Stem(s);
James H. Miller, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Bark;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; dormant season
Shep Zedaker, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Shep Zedaker, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park (Maryland, Washington, D.C., and West Virginia)
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area (Pennsylvania)
Rock Creek National Park (Washington, D.C.)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council
Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation, 2009