border privet USDA PLANTS Symbol: LIOB
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Ligustrum obtusifolium Sieb. & Zucc.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Scrophulariales: Oleaceae
Native Range: Japan (REHD, BAIL);

Appearance
Ligustrum obtusifolium is a woody, perennial, semi-deciduous shrub that grows to 10 ft. (3 m) in height. It is many stemmed and has pubescent branchlets.
Foliage
Its opposite leaves are elliptic to oblong-ovate in shape and measure 1-2 in. (2.5-5 cm) long and 0.3-1 in. (0.75-2.5 cm) wide. The apex of the leaf can be either acute or obtuse in shape. The upper leaf surface is dark green in color, while the lower surface is pubescent, or only pubescent on the mid-rib.
Flowers
The white flowers of Ligustrum obtusifolium are unpleasantly scented and are borne in nodding panicles that measure 0.75-1.5 in. (2-2.5 cm) long. The flowers appear on the plant in June.
Fruit
The fruits are black or blue-black, somewhat glaucous drupes. They are subglobose in shape and measure 0.25 in. (6 mm) in length. Fruit appear on the plant in September and persist on the branches into the winter.
Ecological Threat
Like Ligustrum vulgare and L. sinense, this plant is capable of escaping to form dense thickets that can crowd out native species.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Colonial National Historical Park (Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
City of Ann Arbor Michigan Parks and Recreation
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, 1994.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Eric Ulaszek, U.S. Forest Service, Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie, Illinois
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Pennypack Ecological Restoration Trust, Pennsylvania.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council