saltcedar USDA PLANTS Symbol: TARA
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Hardwood Trees Shrub or Subshrub
Tamarix ramosissima Ledeb.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Violales: Tamaricaceae
Synonym(s): salt cedar, salt-cedar, tamarisk, tamarix
Native Range: Temp. & trop. Asia, Europe (GRIN);

Appearance
Tamarix ramosissima is a deciduous shrub that can grow up to 15-20 ft. (4.6-6.1 m) in height. The bark is smooth and reddish on younger plants, turning brown and furrowed with age.
Foliage
Leaves are small, scale-like, gray-green in color, and overlap along the stem.
Flowers
The 5-petaled flowers are pale pink to white, in dense plumes that bloom from early spring to late fall.
Fruit
Fruit capsules contain numerous tiny (0.04 in. [0.1 cm] diameter) seeds.
Ecological Threat
T.ramosissima invades stream banks, sandbars, lake margins, wetlands, moist rangelands, and saline environments. It can crowd out native riparian species, diminish early successional habitat, and reduce water tables and interferes with hydrologic process.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); establishing on beach
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Introduced as an ornamental from Asia, invades riparian (streamside) areas throughout the American West. It accumulates salt in its tissues, which is later released into the soil, making it unsuitable for many native species.
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Introduced as an ornamental from Asia, invades riparian (streamside) areas throughout the American West. It accumulates salt in its tissues, which is later released into the soil, making it unsuitable for many native species.
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s);
Bonnie Million, National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Twig(s)/Shoot(s);
Bonnie Million, National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Bonnie Million, National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Death Valley National Park (California)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
Lake Mead National Park (Nevada)
Organ Pipe National Monument (Arizona)
Theodore Roosevelt National Park (North Dakota)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jackie Poole, Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (personal communication)
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council