French tamarisk USDA PLANTS Symbol: TAGA
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub Hardwood Trees
Tamarix gallica L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Violales: Tamaricaceae
Synonym(s): saltcedar, tamarisk, tamarix
Native Range: Meditteranean reg. (REHD, )

Appearance
Tamarix gallica is deciduous shrub that can grow up to 15 ft. (4.8 m) in height.
Foliage
Leaves are small, scale-like, gray-green in color, and overlap along the stem. The bark is smooth and reddish on younger plants, turning brown and furrowed with age.
Flowers
Flowers are small and white to pink in color.
Fruit
Fruits are small capsules.
Ecological Threat
Several species are considered invasive in the United States and distinguishing the species can often be difficult. Tamarix gallica invades streambanks, sandbars, lake margins, wetlands, moist rangelands, and saline environments. It can crowd out native riparian species, diminish early successional habitat, and reduce water tables and interferes with hydrologic process. Tamarix gallica is native to Eurasia and Africa and was introduced into the western United States as an ornamental in the early 1800s. It occurs throughout the western and central United States, but is most problematic in the Southwest.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Tree(s);
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Lake Meredith National Recreation Area (Texas)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council