castorbean USDA PLANTS Symbol: RICO3
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub Hardwood Trees
Ricinus communis L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Euphorbiales: Euphorbiaceae
Synonym(s): agaliya, castor bean, lama palagi, maskerekur, toto ni vavalagi, uluchula skoki

Appearance
Ricinus communis is an annual evergreen shrub that can grow from 3.3-16.4 ft. (1-5 m) tall.
Foliage
Stems are red to green or purple in color. Leaves are alternate, peltate, petiolate, palmate, toothed, and can be 11.8 in. (30 cm) across.
Flowers
Flowers are apetalous (without petals), pediculate with 5-parted calyx and many branching stamens and yellow anthers. Blooming occurs from August to November.
Fruit
Capsules are red, green or purple in color, covered in dense sharp spines, 0.6 in. (1.5 cm) in diameter, and contain 3 seeds. Seeds are mottled in color with black and copper colors.
Ecological Threat
Ricinus communis can be found in disturbed areas such as in fields, pastures and along roadsides and railroads. It is native to Asia. Be aware, this plant is extremely toxic to humans and consuming just a few seeds can be fatal.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Research; Plant physiologist Grace Chen removes castor bean pods to test for genetic transformation.
Brian Perchtel, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); A castor bean pod.
Brian Perchtel, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seed(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Landscape plant introduced from the old world tropics in the early 1900s, is a beautiful but deadly poisonous plant.
James Preacher, Army Corps of Engineers, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Fruit(s); immature seed capsules
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Female and male flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); Female and male flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Hawaiian Alien Plant Studies, 1998