curly-leaved pondweed USDA PLANTS Symbol: POCR3
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic Plants Forbs/Herbs
Potamogeton crispus L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Najadales: Potamogetonaceae
Synonym(s): curly-leaved pondweed, curly pondweed
Native Range: Africa, temp. & trop. Asia, Australasia, Europe (GRIN);

Appearance
Potamogeton crispus is a perennial, submerged, aquatic herb that is native to Eurasia.
Foliage
Leaves are sessile, oblong, stiff, 1.6-3.9 in. (4-10 cm) long, 0.2-0.4 in. (5-10 mm) wide, translucent and have noticeably curly margins (resemble lasagna noodles).
Flowers
Flowering occurs in the summer to early fall, when emergent flowers develop. Flowers are brown, inconspicuous and wind pollinated.
Fruit
Fruits are flat with a pointed beak and are 0.16-0.24 in. (4-6 mm) long. The seed do not seem to be viable. In the midsummer plants form turions (vegetative buds), from which new growth starts in fall or winter.
Ecological Threat
Potamogeton crispus tolerates fresh or slightly brackish water and can grow in shallow, deep, still or flowing water. Plants can grow in clear or turbid water, but are mostly shade intolerant. The method of introduction is unclear and it may have been introduced as a hitchhiker on boats, through the aquarium trade, or accidently when stock from a fish hatchery was released. It was first collected in 1860.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Feature(s); Turion
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Chris Evans, University of Illinois, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Chris Evans, University of Illinois, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 1: 81.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Lake Mead National Park (Nevada)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Invasive Plant Council of New York State
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation