henbit USDA PLANTS Symbol: LAAM
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Lamium amplexicaule L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Lamiales: Lamiaceae
Synonym(s): henbit deadnettle, common henbit, giraffehead, henbit
Native Range: Africa, Asia, Europe (); Not Found (BAIL)

Appearance
Lamium amplexicaule is is a cool season annual weed in the mint family (Lamiaceae). It has square stems that reach 6-15 in. in height. Unlike many plants in the mint family, henbit does not have a strong or distinctive odor. Henbit has a fibrous root system.
Foliage
Leaves those on the stem that are not associated with flowers have petioles. Upper leaves have no petioles and occur just below flower clusters. Both types of leaves are somewhat rounded, coarsely toothed, and occur in pairs on opposite sides of the stem.
Flowers
Flowers are about 1 1/2 inches long, purple, and have hairy bracts.
Fruit
Seeds are found in nutlike fruits (mericarps) and are light to dark brown.
Ecological Threat
Lamium amplexicaule can be found in thrives in cool, moist areas and occurs in yards, parks, roadsides, fallow fields, winter grain crops, pastures, and turf grass. It can be highly competitive in newly seeded areas. Lamium amplexicaule has been found to be an overwintering host for soybean cyst nematode. it is also an alternative host for corn earworm.

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Seedling(s);
Ohio State Weed Lab , The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s); Ventral view of two nutlets. Elaiosome at bottom.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Antietam National Battlefield (Maryland)
Fort Bowie National Historic Site (Arizona)
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park (West Virginia)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Kentucky Exotic Pest Plant Council
Maryland Cooperative Extension Service.  2003. Invasive Plant Control in Maryland. Home and Garden Information Center, Home and Garden Mimeo HG88. 4 pp.
Maryland Department of Natural Resources, 1994
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005