orange hawkweed USDA PLANTS Symbol: HIAU
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Hieracium aurantiacum L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Asterales: Asteraceae
Native Range: Europe (BAIL);

Appearance
Hieracium aurantiacum is a perennial plant that is 11.8-23.6 in. (30-60 cm) tall and produces a milky sap.
Foliage
Leaves are mostly basal, elliptical, 2-8 in. (5-20 cm) long, 0.4-1.2 in. (1-3 cm) wide and covered with short, stiff, black hairs. The stems can grow up to 12 in. (30.5 m) tall.
Flowers
Flowers appear in compact cluster of 5 or more dandelion-like flowers on short hairy stalks at the top of the plant. They are 0.75-1 in. (1.9-2.5 cm) across, orange to red, have square-edged petals and appear in May to June on leafless flower stalks.
Fruit
Fruit is a dark seed with a tuft of white hair to be carried in the wind. The plant can spread by seeds, stolons, and rhizomes.
Ecological Threat
Hieracium aurantiacum is usually found in sunny areas and occurs in disturbed areas such as roadsides, gravel pits, meadows, and pastures. It is native to Europe.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s);
Washington State University , Washington State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in flower
Nanna Borcherdt, Sitka Conservation Society, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Michael Shephard, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
UAF Cooperative Extension , University of Alaska - Fairbanks, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Ken Chamberlain, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Ken Chamberlain, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 3: 334.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Great Smoky Mountains National Park (North Carolina & Tennessee)
Rocky Mountains National Park (Colorado)
Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Faith Campbell, 1998
Forest Service-Alaska, 2004
Hoffman, R. & K. Kearns, Eds. 1997. Wisconsin manual of control recommendations for ecologically invasive plants. Wisconsin Dept. Natural Resources, Bureau of Endangered Resources. Madison, Wisconsin. 102pp.
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998