Scotch broom USDA PLANTS Symbol: CYSC4
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Cytisus scoparius (L.) Link

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Fabales: Fabaceae (Leguminosae)
Synonym(s): Scottish broom, English broom, scotchbroom
Native Range: Central and Southern Europe (REHD, BAIL);

Appearance
Cytisus scoparius is a perennial shrub that grows on average from 3.3-9.8 ft. (1-3 m) tall, but can reach to 13 ft. (4 m). The stems are five-angled and remain green all year.
Foliage
Leaves are small, alternate and compound with 3 leaflets. The leaves are often not noticeable, due to the dark green stems.
Flowers
The flowers are bright yellow, resemble sweet pea flowers, and occur singly or in pairs in the upper leaf axils. They bloom from late May to June.
Fruit
Seed pods are fuzzy on the edges, 1-2 in. (2.5-5 cm) long, and will explode when mature forcefully expelling the seeds. The seeds are small and multi-colored, ranging from green to brown to reddish brown.
Ecological Threat
Cytisus scoparius occurs along roadsides, coastal sites, disturbed sites, pastures, and dry scrubland. Its nitrogen fixing ability allows it to compete successfully on poor, dry, sandy soils. It grows well in full sun. It has been considered a pest weed since the 1920’s on the West Coast. Cytisus scoparius is native to western and central Europe. It was introduced into the United States as an ornamental in the early 1800s.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Foliage;
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s); Growing to 1.5 m in height. Flowers May to June. Common on sandy soils. Poland
Gil Wojciech, Polish Forest Research Institute, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s); yellow and red color morph
Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Utah State University , , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); in flower
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s); Seed pods
William M. Ciesla, Forest Health Management International, Bugwood.org
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Twig(s)/Shoot(s); bud
Robert Vidéki, Doronicum Kft., Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Steve Hurst, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s);
Suzanne Foster, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 2: 350.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Tom Heutte, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Eric Coombs, Oregon Department of Agriculture, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Redwood National Park (California)
Yosemite National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
Native Plant Society of Oregon, 2008
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
South Carolina Exotic Pest Plant Council