yellow starthistle USDA PLANTS Symbol: CESO3
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Centaurea solstitialis L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Asterales: Asteraceae
Synonym(s): yellow star thistle, yellow star-thistle, golden starthistle, yellow cockspur, St. Barnaby's thistle
Native Range: Africa, temp. Asia, Europe (GRIN);

Appearance
This annual plant can grow 0.25-3 ft. (0.07-0.9 m) in height.
Foliage
Leaves that are located near the base are petiolate, dissected, 2-6 in. (5-15.2 cm) long. These certain leaves are normally absent during the time of flowering. Leaves further up the stem are 0.4-4 in. (1-10 cm) long.
Flowers
Flowering occurs from June-October. Yellow flowers appear in heads at the tips of the branches. Bracts that extend the flower head have a small cluster of spines.
Fruit
This seed type represents between 10 and 25% of the total seed and often remains in the seed-heads until late fall or winter. The central flowers produce glossy, gray, or tan to mottled cream-colored and tan seeds with a short, stiff, unequal, white pappus 0.08-0.2 in. (2-5 mm) long.
Ecological Threat
Centaurea solstitialis invades woodlands, fields, pastures and roadsides.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); in flower
Charles Turner, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Peggy Greb, USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Spines are equal to or greater than 45° angle from stem
Cindy Roche, , Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Seedling stage
Cindy Roche, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Bolting stage
Cindy Roche, , Bugwood.org
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Plant(s); Rosette
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Foliage;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Feature(s); Spines
Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Cindy Roche, , Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); Britton, N.L., and A. Brown. 1913. Illustrated flora of the northern states and Canada. Vol. 3: 560.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Death Valley National Park (California)
Grand Canyon National Park (Arizona)
Redwood National Park (California)
Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (Californina)
Yosemite National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
California Invasive Plant Council
Faith Campbell, 1998
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Mid-Atlantic Exotic Pest Plant Council, 2005
National  Wildlife Refuge Association, Silent Invasion: A Call to Action from the National Wildlife Refuge Association, 2002. Washington DC. 17 pp.
New Jersey Department of Agriculture, Division of Plant Industry, 2004
Pacific Northwest Exotic Pest Plant Council, 1998