brittleleaf naiad USDA PLANTS Symbol: NAMI
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Aquatic Plants Forbs/Herbs
Najas minor All.

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Taxonomic Rank: Liliopsida: Najadales: Najadaceae
Synonym(s): brittle waternymph, brittleleaf naiad, European naiad, spinyleaf naiad, slender-leaved naiad
Native Range: Asia, N. and trop. Africa ()

Appearance
Najas minor is an herbaceous, aquatic annual with stems that can grow 4-7.75 in. (10-20 cm) long. These stems can be up to 0.04 in. (1 mm) thick.
Foliage
The oppositely arranged, dark green leaves become recurved as they age, and have serrulate margins with 7-15 small teeth on each side. The leaf base is truncate or lobed. The leaves measure 0.2-1.25 in. (0.5-3.5 cm) long and 0.007-0.05 in. (0.1-1.2 mm) wide.
Flowers
Najas minor is a monoecious plant, with 1-2 flowers per axil. The male flowers are located distally and are 0.08 in. (1.9-2.2 mm) in size. The involucre has two lobes and the beaks are 0.02-0.08 in. (0.4-2.1 mm) in length. The female flowers are located in the distal to proximal axils and measure 0.8 in. (2.2 mm) in size.
Fruit
The spindle-shaped seeds of this plant are 0.05-0.1 in. (1.5-3 mm) in size and purple colored.
Ecological Threat
Najas minor has the ability to form thick stands that can cover or clog a lake or stream. This plant is extremely brittle, which allows it to fragment and get moved via boats, waterfowl and river channels. Waterfowl readily eat and move this plant from waterbody to waterbody. In North Carolina, this plant is reported to out-compete other exotics such as Hydrilla verticillata. This plant needs to be watched, contained or removed if found.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s);
Troy Evans, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s);
Leslie J. Mehrhoff, University of Connecticut, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); USDA NRCS. Wetland flora: Field office illustrated guide to plant species. USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.
USDA PLANTS Database, USDA NRCS PLANTS Database, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.


Invasive Listing Sources:
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group
Faith Campbell, 1998
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee. 2005. Guide to Invasive Upland Plant Species in New Hampshire. New Hampshire Department of Agriculture,  Markets and Food Plant Industry Division and New Hampshire Invasive Species Committee.
Tennessee Exotic Pest Plant Council
Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation
Virginia Invasive Plant Species List