largeleaf lantana USDA PLANTS Symbol: LACA2
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Shrub or Subshrub
Lantana camara L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Lamiales: Verbenaceae
Synonym(s): lantana, largeleaf lantana
Native Range: West Indies; Trop. Amer. (BAIL);

Appearance
Lantana camara is a perennial shrub that can grow from 6-15 ft. (1.8-4.6 m).
Foliage
Leaves are ovate and opposite along the square stem. Stems and leaves emit an unpleasant “spicy” smell when crushed.
Flowers
Flowers are colorful, tubular, 4-petaled and occur nearly all year long. Flowers can be orange, pink or white with different colored flowers occurring in the same cluster.
Fruit
Fruits are small, round drupes, green to black and shiny and contain 2 seeds.
Ecological Threat
Lantana camara is native to Central and South America and occurs in open to partly shaded moist areas. It was introduced into the United States in the 1800s and is still sold as an ornamental for landscaping. May be confused with threatened native species with which it readily hybridizes.

Identification, Biology, Control and Management Resources

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Flower(s);
USDA APHIS PPQ - Oxford, North Carolina , USDA APHIS PPQ, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in flower
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
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Plant(s);
John D. Byrd, Mississippi State University, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s); flowers and leaves
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Rebekah D. Wallace, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Control;
Dan Clark, USDI National Park Service, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); habit
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); in flower
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Flower(s);
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation;
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
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Infestation;
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Plant(s); with red flowers
Forest and Kim Starr, Starr Environmental, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Haleakala National Park (Hawaii)
Organ Pipe National Monument (Arizona)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Archbold Biological Station
Faith Campbell, 1998
Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council
Georgia Exotic Pest Plant Council
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007
John Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Survey of TNC Preserves, 1995.
Reichard, Sarah. 1994.  Assessing the potential of invasiveness in woody plants introduced in North America. University of Washington Ph.D. dissertation.
University of Hawaii, Botany Department, Hawaiian Alien Plant Studies, 1998