oriental mustard USDA PLANTS Symbol: SIOR4
U.S. Nativity: Exotic
Habit: Forbs/Herbs
Sisymbrium orientale L.

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Taxonomic Rank: Magnoliopsida: Capparales: Brassicaceae
Synonym(s): Indian hedgemustard
Native Range: Africa, temp. & trop Asia, Europe (GRIN);

Appearance
Sisymbrium orientale is an annual herb. It is a species of flowering plant in the mustard family known by the common names Indian hedgemustard and Eastern rocket.
Foliage
Oriental mustard produces a hairy, branching stem up to about 11.8 in. (30 cm) tall. The basal leaves are divided into deep lobes or toothed leaflets. Leaves higher on the stem have lance-shaped blades with small separate lobes near the base.
Flowers
The top of the stem is occupied by a raceme (is a inflorescence that is unbranched and indeterminate and bears pedicellate flowers) of flowers with light yellow petals each measuring up to a centimeter long.
Fruit
The fruit is a silique which can be up to 3.9 in. (10 cm) long.
Ecological Threat
Sisymbrium orientale infests roadsides, ditches and fields. It is native to Europe, Asia, and North Africa.

Selected Images from Invasive.orgView All Images at Invasive.org


Plant(s); in flower
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
Additional Resolutions & Image Usage

Infestation; Dominating grassland along the road
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
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Infestation; A grassland invasion
John M. Randall, The Nature Conservancy, Bugwood.org
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Flower(s);
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Fruit(s);
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Foliage; stem leaf
Joseph M. DiTomaso, University of California - Davis, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s); The transversely convex face of two seeds. Cotyledons represent the larger bulge, which sometimes has greenish speckling.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s); Seeds positioned on their sides, with the transversely ridged side facing left and the hilum at the top.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
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Seed(s); Looking down at the hilar region of three seeds.
D. Walters and C. Southwick, USDA, Bugwood.org
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EDDMapS Distribution:
This map is incomplete and is based only on current site and county level reports made by experts and records obtained from USDA Plants Database. For more information, visit www.eddmaps.org
 


State(s) Where Reported invasive.
Based on state level agency and organization lists of invasive plants from WeedUS database.

U.S. National Parks where reported invasive:
Death Valley National Park (California)



Invasive Listing Sources:
Jil M. Swearingen, Survey of invasive plants occurring on National Park Service lands, 2000-2007